Okay, it’s a saga. I would like to write a book one day on the trials, tribulations, joys and triumphs of launching this company. But right now, I’m too busy. I’m so busy that I don’t even have time to blog. So until I find some time for a nice juicy blog, I intend to specialize in something that’s shorter than a blog entry but it’s longer than a tweet…let’s call it bleet.

Have you ever noticed how corporate America has this understandable metaphoric relationship with sports? Sure you have. People climbing mountains in business attire, jumping hurtles in a three-piece, or huddling on the 20 yard line in his and hers power suits. It’s in our language as well. It’s all the extra mile, teamwork, excellence, passing the baton, climbing to the summit…bish, bash bosh. Anyway, the comparisons between business and sports for most companies end right there, at the symbolic level.

It actually takes a lot of time to excel at something. Excelling takes a lot of practice. Can you imagine how good a company would be if it actually took the time to “practice” the fundamentals the way sports teams do? Run those plays until your role is second nature; practice that shot in so many variations that if your opponent tries to stop you, you can create “in the air” and get the ball in the hoop. Wouldn’t it be cool if companies had the time to adopt more than a “one and done” approach to training for that level of excellence?

It would be. But it’s not easy because they have to do that other thing called profit making; and that takes time as well. Wouldn’t it be cool if we could perfect a safe download to the brain, from the almighty cloud? Zeros and ones baby. Need some teamwork? Just click the Download button. Diversity, you say? Just stream it from this portal. Leadership? No prob. Give me a nanosecond.

Unfortunately, we’re not in the Matrix, and we don’t have an info dump dock at the base of our skulls. But Ray Kurzweil’s gonna take care of that shortly. Go Ray! I love your keyboard, man. So, until the singularity actually gets here, we’ll have to use that time consuming route called corporate training and continuous improvement.